Men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who want to avoid immediate surgery or radiation can safely choose to actively monitor the disease as a treatment method, according to a study released Saturday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Researchers in the study determined most men shouldn’t panic or rush to treatment decisions following a diagnosis as the mortality rate from the cancer 15 years later was relatively low regardless of treatment approach.

The study, which began in the United Kingdom in 1999, involved 2,664 men between the ages of 50 and 69 who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Of those men, 1,643 were enrolled in a trial studying three different treatment methods – surgery to remove tumors (553), radiation (545), and active monitoring (545).

After a median range of 15 years, researchers compared the participants with death from prostate cancer and death from other causes. The study noted that more than one third of the men were considered to be intermediate or high-risk when diagnosed.

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Out of the 1,610 patients who were followed up on, 45 men died from prostate cancer – 17 who were in the active-monitoring group, 12 who had surgery to remove tumors, and 16 who completed radiation.

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Death not attributed to prostate cancer occurred in 356 men with similar numbers in all three treatment groups.

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H/T Fox News (read more at FoxNews.com)

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